Saturday, September 21, 2019

Sardines and Bread - the russian touch



A few months ago, there was a certain brand of sardines on sale at one of the local supermarkets.

It was a promotional sale - two at the price of one. There were two versions: in oil and in brine. I bought those in brine. Very salty stuff, so I put it in water to eliminate some of its salt, and at the same time I told myself that I won't be buying it any more. Salt, like sugar and oil, definitely has its drawbacks.


 oil version (orange colored ); only two tins available on  shelf

Well, I  did buy it again. ( At present, it's not available on the shelf.  I suppose they'll bring it  in the cold months when people drink hot tea and/or vodka that go well with salty foods ). 
So, what made me buy it again?

I've noticed that  if I put even a small  sardine in my egg and veggies sandwich , it keeps me satiated  for quite a while. That's important if you wish to maintain normal body weight. I checked nutritional values: 21 gram protein per 100 gram sardines; ok! On the other hand, Tuna in brine, has even more protein, and less salt...so, why  buy this particular sardine stuff?

Good question. Well, I never felt that tuna, with all its  popularity as a healthy, low calorie-high protein sandwich filling -  kept  me satiated for long.  Perhaps it's an entirely subjective feeling that has nothing to do with reality. I don't  know. I need some more time to find out the answer.

There are no additives in this product (Ivasi); just sardines, water and lots of salt (350mg). Sardines have one obvious advantage over tuna: the little softened, white bones full of calcium which is said to be beneficial to our bones.

Anyway, for some reason, these  sardines are popular with customers of russian descent (have I mentioned vodka?!)   The owners of the supermarket (actually a chain of supermarkets), are also of russian descent ; that would explain why this product is not found elsewhere.
*
Many of the above customers  also buy bread made of spelt flour . Spelt is considered the wild ancestor of wheat. In the 18th century it was the main food source for the russian peasants. Today, spelt is experiencing  a 'comeback' , an increase in popularity, as russians everywhere are becoming more health-conscious.

 packed sliced loaves of spelt bread on the supermarket's shelves

loaf of spelt bread - the wrapping paper - not eco friendly

Spelt bread is relatively high in protein and thus, of great help to those with dietary intentions, as it serves as a metabolic booster, and gives one a feeling of fullness. Two slices of this quite tasty bread  keep you going for most of the day. If only they would wrap it in an eco-friendly way! 


slices of spelt bread

The non-lazy  among potential consumers can buy the spelt flour package and bake, the real thing, at home.

packages with spelt flour



52 comments:

  1. I was about to say that it could be because of the bones that sardines have and tuna not. They are probably nutritional too, beside having minerals and vitamins. Slavic countries prefer sardines over tuna, as tuna is more exotic and we've had it in our shops only from recent decade or two, before it was just sardines. When I went to kindergarden, they used to give us mashed sardines spread over bread for a snack and it wasn't half bad, I can tell you :) Spelt is also popular here, we lived on it in mediaeval times and it is back now again. Very cheap and very healthy. I even bought a can of preserved spelt recently, will probably put it in a salad or something.

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    1. Yes, the bones make a difference.
      I remember from my childhood, mashed sardines with added tomatoes and olives. Delicious!

      The bakery that supplies the spelt bread to the supermarket, also supplies a scandinavian rural type of rye bread. It's cheaper than the spelt one but equally tasty and with thinner slices. I'm quite fond of it.

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    2. Yes, I eat rye bread too every day, it is about half a euro per loaf here, but you've seen that we have bakeries here at every corner :) I have three bread shops in my block, actually. We don't eat flakes and cereals but bread for breakfast and dinner.

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    3. Half a euro? that's very cheap! the rye bread I've mentioned is about two euro. but then, food is quite expensive here.

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    4. We're the bread basket of Serbia :) And we also have a law according to which all bakeries and bread factories have to produce a certain percent of plain white bread of a very low price (set by the government) so that the poorest ones can buy it too. It is now about 30 cents, I think. That is one of the good leftovers from our old socialism.

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    5. That's nice; a really good 'leftover' from socialism. Bread has always been basic, essential food for the masses of people, and will continue to be so.

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  2. I really should try spelt flour one day as I understand that some people who are gluten intolerant are able to tolerate it. I have actually purchased it a couple of times but not got around to using it.

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    1. As far as I know, spelt is not glutten free; it's just that its glutten is somewhat different or weaker than that of wheat. That's perhaps why there are people who will tolerate it.

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  3. I eat sardines too, but I usually buy them in tomato sauce. Actually I don't have any right now and should add them to the shopping list. I have noticed that many of the outward bound adventures, and wilderness camping trips carry sardines for their highly nutritious content. Now maybe I have to add that vodka!

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    1. Many consumers prefer sardines in tomatoe sauce which is kind of neutral and helps them keep away from oil and salt.
      It should be mentioned, that sardines are also good not only on trips, but also as an emergency provision sort of food at home.

      As for vodka, I suppose it's "needed" mainly with the very strongly salted brine:)

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  4. I remember in the 90's when a lot of Russian Jews were moving to Israel. People said it was prophetic. Interesting to see this here. It's like a little piece of home, I would think. It must be hard to move to a new culture.

    Duta, how did you feel about the election results?

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    1. You've defined it exactly - they've created here 'a little piece of home'.
      Election results? Well, I'm indifferent to them. You'll feel too like that if you'll think the country's on the decline, and there's no way back.

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    2. Why do you think it is in decline?

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    3. Oh, Sandi dear, to answer your question will require a whole post. I'll say just this - it is a process going on in many countries, caused by divisiveness and corruption.

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  5. The bread looks so good. Maybe the brined sardines taste better for the brine too.

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    1. The bread looks good and tastes good. I prefer the sardines in brine rather than in oil, but sometimes the brine is just too strong for me, as in the case of the Ivasi sardines. I can put them in water, but the original taste gets a bit spoilt.

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  6. I prefer sardine in tomato sauce, and add some lemon juice. It's still a little salty for me, so normally I add some water and bring to boil.
    I know, you're going to say "spoilt", lol.

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    1. I think sardines in tomato sauce is the best choice. Lemon is always a good addition.
      The brand on sale, Ivasi, was available only in oil or brine and the brine was very salty. I had to keep it in water for a few minutes.No damage done :)

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  7. That's a long time I haven't eaten sardines, never think of it. Anyway I eat almost everything and don't pay attention, I always keep the same weight around 68 kgs and fortunately have no health problems.

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    1. You're lucky to have good genetics. You're tall and slim. Me, if I exceed the 60 kg, I immediately feel it in my knees. Body weight can be quite crucial to health issues.

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  8. Over here spelt is referred to as hulled wheat. I had to look it up since I'd never heard of spelt. I love sardines though. I usually get them in oil.

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    1. Spelt is in fact a type of wheat.
      Sardines, even the canned stuff, have omega -3 fats and thus beneficial to our health.

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  9. I have never tried sardines, but I really like tuna. I think in my country we love herrings best, also wuite salty, but very tasty and healthy.I have baked a spelt bread before, definitely healthier option than regular, but I haven't baked it in a while now. Have a lovely day☺

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    1. As far as I know, sardines and herrings actually belong to the same family of fish. Sardines are young and small, when they get older and bigger they're called herrings. Both are healthy, even in canned form.
      If you bake your own bread, then you get the best loaf possible.

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    2. That is so intetesting, I have never heard about it before, thank you so much for info☺

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    3. The bottom line for us - fish in all its forms (fresh, frozen, canned) is good and beneficial, so we should make the most of it.

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  10. I like sardines, and have done so since I was a little kid. I always buy them in oil...I prefer the oil. They are really good for you...there is nothing bad about the oil, either. It is good for you, too.

    I always have a few tins of sardines in my cupboard.

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    1. I agree. It's good food, with a lot of nutrients and anti-oxidants. It's wise to keep a few tins in the cupboard, as you and many others do.

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  11. Very interesting about the sardines/protein and being satiated. I used to ask for sardines in my Christmas stocking and Easter basket (along with marinated herring and olives. I was a weird kid.) I haven't had them in brine or oil, just mustard or tomato sauce. I can see where that would be a little salty.

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    1. Yes,it is interesting how sardines and their protein can keep hunger away from us for quite a while, and thus helping in weight loss.
      We all know that, but for some reason, many ignore it and that's a pity.

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  12. Awareness of healthy clothing is within us but not everyone is ready to read information about the composition on the product, whether it is laziness or because of small letters on the marked.
    I don't like bread, I don't buy bread, I don't buy it, but I buy bread from a Polish bakery because it tastes best.

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    1. Hi Agnes,
      Now that you've mentioned it, healthy clothes are those made of natural, organic fabrics: cotton, wool, silk..
      There's even an organization of volunteers "Trusted Clothes", dedicated to promote healthy fashion.

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  13. I used to eat sardines. When I was teenager my mom told my stepdad she was making him a fish dinner. She served sardines. There was a scene. LOL
    That bread looks delicious.

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    1. Well, your mom was not far from the truth. Sardines are fish.
      Many people will say to you that any bread looks and is delicious.

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  14. I eat no fish. My husband and son want to eat some more fish. I tried to bake it a few times. But ... its smells so "dirty" ...

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    1. Smells can put off anone. I would like, for example, to have goat milk/yoghurt/cheese, but the goat smell is too much for me.

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  15. I eat tuna, and I'm hungry in an hour. It depends upon what you have with it, I suppose. I quite like sardines on crackers!

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    1. Perhaps, it depends on the type of protein. Tuna and sardines might have different types of protein that act differently on the body.
      Nothing is simple in our world.

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  16. these sardines have to be good. good post.
    I see that we read each other, what do you think if we also follow each other? You already tell me. Kisses

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    1. Thank you. Check your list od followers. I'm there (Duta), the last on the list.
      Hugs and blessings to you!

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  17. I never even consider buying sardines, as it's hard to look at those little fish, for me, and put them in my mouth. Maybe that's weird, but you're making me rethink it, DUTA...I just don't have to look. I used to eat them growing up, as my parents bought them. I also appreciate how dedicated you are to eating healthy. You inspire me.

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    1. Our body needs about 40-45 gram protein per day in order to function properly and avoid gaining weight, so where do you take it from? Fish (fresh, frozen or canned) is one of the best, easily available sources.

      I feel very flattered by the last three words of your comment! Thanks.

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  18. You have really created an interesting and informative post. I thoroughly enjoyed reading this. It is so helpful because you explained it so well.

    I absolutely love sardines. Thank you for sharing such an informative post. This is good to know.

    Wishing you a Happy Friday!

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    1. Sardines are popular. Maybe not the best, certainly not the worst food, but people do like them. It's a beneficial food item.
      Thanks for your kind comment.
      Happy Friday to you too!

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  19. After reading this post, Duta, I plan on buying a few cans of sardines. I haven’t thought if them in years, although growing up my mother always had them in oil. Yes, I would also eat the bones. I also liked anchovies in salad or on pizza. We usually have a few cans of tuna in the pantry as my husband likes it. I have heard of spelt but never tried any bread made from it. The one you showed looked good and would be good with sardines I’m sure. Thanks too for your comment about my recent Castle post, much appreciated.

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    1. It's good to have a few cans in the pantry as sardines are also considered as suitable for times of emergency. Spelt bread is becoming more and more popular,but its price in our parts is rather expensive.

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  20. A timely reminder Duta for us to eat more fish. The bones in sardines are so beneficial. I like to leave them in when eating tinned salmon too, for the calcium benefit.
    That is interesting regarding spelt bread - I didn't realise it had perhaps a slightly lower gluten content.
    Thanks again for an interesting subject of discussion :D)

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    1. You're welcome.
      Yes, the little bones are very beneficial, especially for us, women.
      As for gluten, people will either have it or not. Spelt is a bit different, but still does have gluten. Personally, I'm not particular about gluten.

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  21. We always have sardines in the house!
    They are rich in numerous nutrients that have been found to support cardiovascular health, is usually reasonably priced, very filling and low carb!

    A winner in our house :)

    All the best Jan

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  22. Yes, appariently the salt is something our bodies need and help us from eating too much. Sardines get a bad wrap.

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