Thursday, June 22, 2017

Tower of Peace


Frankly, I wouldn't like to live in a tower or near the woods - because of safety reasons, fire hazards in particular (See the latest disasters: Grenfell tower -London, and the forest fires in Portugal ).

I 've worked ,however,in a tower for many years, an office tower in Tel Aviv, called Shalom Tower ('shalom' meaning 'peace' in hebrew). 
I wasn't crazy about the place despite the view of the Mediterranean through my window .  I disliked the dependence on elevators and the impatient crowds waiting for them. I did like, though, its central position and proximity to the sea, city market, cultural and  shopping areas.

Panoramic view ,including the sea, from the 19th floor (not digital photo)

Shalom  Tower ,named after Shalom Meir, father of the tower's two developers, 
has 34 floors, the lobby and the first floor serving as free art galleries (mosaics, paintings, sculptures), and photo exhibitions (of people, maps, projects..) with emphasis on the city's history and urban development.

mosaic wall

mosaic wall

photo exhibits

photo exhibits

When its construction was completed, in 1965, it was the tallest tower in  the Middle East. Since then, many towers, both residential and office towers have been  erected in  the major cities of the country, some of them of  great architectural beauty.

Shalom Tower seen from adjacent Herzel street

Whether we like it or not, these towers are taking over. There's shortage of land, of housing, of parking lots, of green spots - so we're told - and the towers are supposed to solve these issues.

Let's hope that towers and skyscrapers regardless of place will bring real 'Shalom' ('Peace')  to the people that live/work in them.

26 comments:

Alicia said...

It's a beautiful tower! I understand your dislike of living in one, even working in one after what we saw on 9-11 in New York, but yes, they do save on space, that's for sure. I love that almost all the places that you post on your blog give so much emphasis to Art. Love that. Maybe I just haven't noticed that when I'm out and about and you have a natural talent for seeing art. I'll have to be more vigilant. Wow, it's nice to hear a little about your personal life. I never imagined you would work in such a beautiful place!

Linda said...

Duta, I love your photos! This is such a fascinating post! Thank you so much for sharing.

Red Rose Alley said...

That is a huge tower, Duta. Is this the tower that you worked in for many years? I'd like to see the mosaic wall and the photo exhibits up close since I enjoy photography. I didn't know "Shalom" meant peace. I learned something today.

~Sheri

DUTA said...

Indeed, it has a basic beauty about it. It's an historical landmark - the first tower - so it attracts many visitors. The art exhibits that cover the lobby and the first floor, tell them all about the tower and about the city it belongs to.

DUTA said...

Thank you. Perhaps I'll add some more photos.

DUTA said...

Yes, it is what we call a skyscraper, and yes it has been my workplace for many years. The art exhibits were added gradually over the years. You can enlarge the photos to see them better.

Saleslady371 said...

I dislike elevators but I use them and impatient crowds are not too much fun! If I understand correctly, the meaning of "Shalom" is peace--nothing missing, nothing broken. What a beautiful word and lovely way to greet one another. We could use a little more shalom here in the U.S.

Shalom, Duta! Enjoy your weekend.
Mary

DUTA said...

The word 'shalom' means 'peace' in hebrew (in yeddish it is spelled sholom, shoilom, shulem). In our israeli and jewish daily life, 'shalom' is also used both as 'hello' and 'good-bye'.

Sharon Wagner said...

There are pluses and minuses to living/working in a tower. My favorite is the perspective of birds in flight. And of course, the views!

DUTA said...

I'm with you about the views; I don't know about birds in flight. Never seen that. I've only heard about damage done by birds to phone lines and the antennas on the top.

Pam said...

Duta, you definitely have quite a view from the tower overlooking the beautiful Mediterranean! It's a nice looking building and great with the art galleries.

Elevators creep me out sometimes, makes me claustrophobic, so I hope you work on a lower floor; plus, it makes it easier for a faster escape also.

Chicago has very tall buildings, my hubby worked in one for years, but I worked out in the suburb where we live, no skyscrapers there! 😉 Good and interesting post!

Shalom!

DUTA said...

I used to work there in the past. Now I'm retired but visit the place from time to time.

When I'm at a hotel, I always ask for a room on the lower floor as I think as you do that it "makes it easier for a faster escape".

Poppy said...

Like the Shalom Tower, which is to be commended for its appreciation of the arts, condominiums (residential skyscrapers) are sprouting up all over my hometown of Toronto, Canada.

When you've grown up in a city that has devoted itself to green spaces and mostly single-family homes, it's hard for the eye to adjust to such concrete monsters, but these are different times, and for the reasons that you stated, call for different measures, I guess.

Your views to the Med must have made those elevator rides worth it.

Happy Sunday, Duta!

Poppy

DUTA said...

Israel imitates the West in everything including skyscrapers. However,unlike Canada, we're a tiny country with real shortage of land in general and in the center,where the jobs are,in particular. So, this easily leads to erection of towers with all the safety, security, and social problems that might occur.

Haddock said...

I too hate multi storied buildings for the same reason - dependence on elevators.

DUTA said...

If there's a fire or ,in war time, alarms - we are not supposed to use them at all. We're to descend on foot!

Kim Standard said...

Yes lets hope the Peace tower and others bring Peace! Yes there are so many taller ones built since 1965....a way of life now

Sue (this n that) said...

I can understand your feelings about when you worked in the tower.
Good views from that one. It's a nice touch how they have a photographic and art display on the lower floors.

DUTA said...

Living in towers has indeed become a way of life in the city. It could easily bring about frictions between the various groups that inhabit them So, it's important that we wish for peace.

DUTA said...

The views, the art, and the location, make it up for most of the possible inconveniences and dangers.

Jenn Jilks said...

Grenfell tower was so awful. Too many disasters. I'm happy to live in a bungalow in a forest!

DUTA said...

I guess you are. I follow a blog written by a woman who lives in a motorhome and wanders with it from one camping site to another. She seems happy too. Dwelling in a tower is not a happy option.

mshatch said...

I don't think I would like living in a tower or a city. Too many people! I'll keep my current arrangement in farm country :)

DUTA said...

"Too many people" indeed. Even in a city one ould live in a decent house or low building, but a tower is a crowded option with almost no benefits.

Lee said...

One would hope that peace reigned supreme...everywhere.

I've never lived nor worked in a tower. I, too, don't enjoy being among a crowd. I stay well away from crowded areas these days...and have done so for a long time.

Here where I live still retains a village atmosphere...and most properties are acreages. This property on which my little cabin sits (with no neighbours within view) is three acres in area.

I shop locally and stay well away from the large shopping centres elsewhere. :)

DUTA said...

Sounds a good place, away from the crowds. The main thing is that you like where and how you live. That gives you inner peace and makes your life enjoyable.