Saturday, April 27, 2019

White Plastic Cover Sheets



Passover is over, and so, we return to our daily routine of habits and activities.  
Holiday Breaks usually make me reflect a lot on the addictions in our life. Everyone is  addicted to something; the question is whether we can control the addiction or it controls us.  I'm glad to say: Yes, I  Can. 

Tradition, religion, culture - all give us  a fair opportunity to test the extent and severity of our addictions , and try to improve things (especially, in the area of the lighter addictions, to food and shopping). 

In judaism, the most holly day is the Atonement Day (Yom Kippur).We are supposed to fast on that day to repent for our sins, ask forgiveness,  and pray to be sealed in the book of life.
Regardless of the religious aspect,  I know I would despise myself for not  fasting on that one day, as the Fast helps  prove to myself that I'm more than just an animal looking for food. 

During  Passover(Pesach) week, it is forbidden to eat bread. I'm a great lover of bread as are many other people. And yet, unlike some other people, I wouldn't dream of making "bread provisions" for this short period of time. 


popular felafel booth- before Pesach

the same booth - closed for Pesach

Sometimes. it's hard to believe what people would do, to avoid the one day fasting and the eight day of abstinence from bread eating!
(For the oriental jews, with roots in North Africa and the Middle East,  life is much easier during Passover, as they're allowed by their rabbis to eat grains , seeds, legumes such as rice, corn, beans. I belong to the Ashkenazi jews with roots in Europe and their Passover has strict rules that don't allow the above). 

Anyway, I say : once a year -  fasting for one day and not eating bread for a week - see it as a chance you're given to test yourself, free yourself of bad habits, improve yourself. Take it, and make the best of it! Being able to control the smaller addictions will help you in your struggle with the heavier ones (if and when they come) like smoking, drugs, gambling.


at the supermarket (before Pesach) : pita bread, bread, cakes, cookies

 Pesach -  leavened food shelf covered with white plastic sheets

It's interesting to note that  white is the color of preferrence during both holidays:  white clothes on Yom Kippur,  white garment for the jew leading the Seder meal on Pesach,  and...at supermarkets, white cover sheets for 'chametz' (leavened food),  just before Pesach.


54 comments:

  1. White is the colour of purity so that is a good choice. I think fasten is healthy in general. I think we too much succumb to addictions instead of being more aware of our lives, emotions and ask ourselves questions of where to go and what to do.
    I had to stop eating bread and dairy because of gluten and dairy problems. Sometimes I eat gluten free bread. Once you are used to it is it not hard
    Here our holidays are now over as well The next one is not before October. But we had great times and enough energy till the next one

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    1. Gluten free is quite the trend everywhere. I have no problems with glutten or dairy products, but I do pay attention to what I eat and how I eat.
      We still have some holidays (smaller ones) next month, but no restrictions involved.
      I totaly agree with your view of our succombing to addictions instead of being more aware of our lives.

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  2. I agree with you that short fasts should not be hard to cope with. Like Marja I am also gluten intolerant so have a restricted diet.

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    1. Definitely. What's a day (24-25 hours) in our life?
      Ive noticed lately, that a lot of products bear the label 'gluten free'. Probably there's a big percentage of gluten intolerant people, and as the customer is always right....

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  3. Interesting thanks for sharing the rules and customs of Pesach.

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    1. You're welcome, Christine.
      It's not easy to fast or abstain from basic food like bread; however, if it's for a short period of time, it could only do us some good.

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  4. I agree with your observation, Duta, about abstaining from foods. While I did nit abstain from chocolate during the recent Lenten season, I decided to try a self imposed fast after Easter because this would be harder for me. A chocolate candy bunny remains untouched so far and I am also hoping it remains so for the next few weeks. Thank you for the information on abstaining from bread during the Passover holiday.

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    1. Kudos to you! As they say, where there's a will, there's a way.
      Chocolate, like bread, can be quite a problem as people love it, and many are addicted to it.

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  5. But what on Earth do you eat those eight days without seeds, grains and bread, even legumes? Just soups and veggies?
    My country is Orthodox (it's their Easter today) and they do fast before Easter and some other holidays, but I think it just mean abstaining from fat and meat.
    I'm a vegetarian so my diet is always a sort of fasting, but I do love me my seeds and lentils and millet and peas :) I probably wouldn't mind a few days of just veggie and fruit smoothies and soups and boiled veggies. Nice to have you back, Duta!

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    1. I thought you said you were vegan not vegetarian. Most people are in the vegetarian category. I'm almost there too.

      There's plenty to eat during Passover. It is a known fact that people even gain weight during this period because they eat a lot of potatoes, bananas; cakes and cookies made of unleavened matza/ potato meal. We eat a lot of protein (eggs, fish, meat), veggies and fruit.
      Thanks Dezmond for your last sentence. Nice to be back!

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    2. No, I'm not vegan. I don't do dairy and I usually don't eat eggs either, but I do sometimes, maybe once or twice a week, eat some bought sweet and they all have milk in them as they put chocolate in them, so I can't call myself a vegan fully :)

      I guess Passover diet could be similar to currently very popular Keto diet which also stays away from flour, but then again Keto also forbids all carbs, including all of the best veggies and fruits like bananas, potatoes, carrots, legumes etc... you just eat green veggies and berries and tons of bacon and eggs in it :) Probably the best way to get rid of pounds, but also the best way to ruin one's heart, sadly.
      I could totally live on potatoes and bananas :)

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    3. What works for me is a low calorie food intake (this is naturally also low- carb and low- fat)with a balance of protein from eggs, fish, and a bit of dairy (milk in the coffee, and cottage cheese on the mashed potatoes).
      My greatest love are fruit which I eat in fresh form and in cooked form. The same applies to veggies. Cooking requires work: peeling, cutting etc.. Although I've got some kitchen gadgets, I find myself using only the knife:)

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  6. That's interesting. I'm not religious at all so I don't have any days like this.

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    1. It's more a matter of tradition than of religion. I don't belong to the religious circles. I respect both religion and tradition because that's how I was brought up, but I have my own way of applying the principles of my education.

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  7. Interesting to see the white sheets and the photos you shared from Israel over Passover. I didn't know that about how the chametz is handled in the shops!! I love the Passover week, and to follow the ordinance of not eating Matzah is so "filling" because its so full of not only "not eating something" but rather the positive command given thousands of years ago by our Creator with so much meaning. Actually, I am still eating matzah, not quite ready to go back to leaven!! Love and blessings and enjoy!! Thanks for sharing. Yes, glad to see you back too as others commented! Blessings!

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    1. I'm not surprised you're still eating matzah; many do. There are people that just love it. And you know what? The arab minority likes it too, although they're not forbidden to eat bread.
      Love and blessings to you too!

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  8. Oh, that was so interesting to read! I love to know more about Jewish traditions,since you are our older brothers in faith☺ I am a catholic christian,so we also have a lot of fasting traditions,they are not so strict though and easy to follow,at least for me☺ Have a lovely week☺

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    1. Thank you.
      Indeed, each religion has its traditions and rules to follow; some are strict, some less strict. There's beauty and versatility, in all this, even for those who claim to be non-believers.

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  9. This is really fascinating and I agree and applaud your faith and self control and adherence to the traditions. I love the idea of a color -- white -- which represents purity to me.

    Thanks so much for your visits! I am always happy to see you at my blog, Duta!

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    1. Thank you, Jeanie, for your very kind words.
      Well, I try, at least for the sake of my concience. Life is full of complexities, and we have to learn and practice self-control to be able to face these complexities.

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  10. I respect all religions. The beginning of the Bible or Tora or Koran is exactly the same. Then I don't believe in religion anymore, because everything what is written was be men, and everybody translated a bit wrong. So I have no religion I only believe. I also like all traditions and would celebrate them all, maybe not when in all religions you are not allowed to eat. I don't understand why, although I am not a big eater !

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    1. I also respect all faiths, religions, and traditions. However, I'm not for organized religion as it triggers power and corruption.
      I believe in God, and pray to Him, mainly in my own words, and in my own home, although I do have prayer books too (inherited from my parents).

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  11. Love this post, DUTA, and it makes me think of how I would do with restrictions. I, too, respect all religions, but don't partake in organized religion. I was surprised to learn that about you.

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    1. Thank you, Bica. I feel flattered.
      May God forgive me, but I think organized religion is the source of a lot of bad behavior among believers and followers of that religion. There are people who use God and religion as a cover for their misbehavior.

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  12. I really learned quite a bit here, and I appreciate it so much. You remind me that I need to get better with some of our traditions too. Hugs...RO

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    1. I'm glad of that, RO. We never stop learning, including about traditions. There are so many!
      Every year more and more tribes, ethnicities, communities are discovered, each with their own beliefs and traditions to explore and enjoy.

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  13. I love reading about your culture, and have learnt so much about your part of the world via your blogs. We are in between cultures here in France, ...not English and not French, but that's alright, it is as it is!

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    1. "...in between cultures..." - this is the situation almost everywhere in the world, not only in your south of France corner. It has its good points and its bad ones.
      Thank you, Vera, for reading my blogs.

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  14. That is interesting! Good for you. I'm not sure I could fast!

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    1. Try it once! You might even like it:)
      In childhood, as kids, we used to fast only half a day on the Atonement Day. As we grew older we were added hours until the age 18-21 when we started to fast a full day. It's not obligatory; each one and his conscience.

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  15. Self-control is a fruit of the spirit. How true that everyone is addicted to something, be it sweets and breads and other bodily pleasures or useless data fed via TV or computer screens. Addictions come in all forms, don’t they? Some addicted to less tangible things that drive them to gratify certain impulses. But food, the most basic of all needs, is a good start for curbing the other appetites of the flesh. The discipline of fasting clears both mind and body simultaneously.

    I’m just now catching up on your posts I missed since I’ve been absent from the blogosphere lately. But here I am, reading a few of your previous posts, like the one on the election. Just curious, were you pleased with the election results? Or not?

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  16. Wow! You put it so well! I wouldn't have been able to phrase things on addictions the way you've done. So accurate and to the point! I completely agree with your view, Debra.

    As for the election results, honestly, I'm indifferent and pessimistic. Regardless of who the winner is, things will not get better.
    Anyway, many thanks for your comment.

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    1. One of our American writers, Mark Twain (I believe it was he who said it) that if voting mattered they wouldn't let us do it. I'm beginning to agree.

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    2. So true! Perhaps at that time, his saying sounded humorous, but nowadays, it reflects a sad reality.

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  17. Interesting about the colour white, which is surely the colour of purity …

    I always enjoy your posts, and this one was no different. It was very interesting to learn more about the rules and customs of Pesach.

    This is why 'blogland' is such a wonderful place, we can learn so much from each other.
    Thank-you.

    All the best Jan

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    1. Indeed, Blogland is a wonderful place to learn things. I feel I learn a lot from reading blogs, including yours. It's a pool of endless knowledge and it enriches us immensely.

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  18. Your posts are awlays informative and interesting. I learned a lot, also that you and I embrace similar philosophies, not religions.

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    1. Thanks, Linda, for your kind words.
      I do respect religion, I just keep away from organized religion.
      As for philosophies, my favorite one is the chinese Feng Shui.

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  19. Hope you had a Happy Passover, Duta!

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    1. Thank God, it was OK. As we advance in age, holidays become rather exhausting, and yet we pray to reach the upcoming holiday and go through it all over again. It gives a sense of accomplishment and of being alive.

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  20. I commend you for setting a good example for the rest of us. Luckily, I don't have any addictions. But, I definitely have vices. Or things I over-indulge in.

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    1. Hi Sharon,
      The distinction between vice (guilty pleasure?) and addiction , sounds, no doubt, more accurate than the one that distinguishes between light and heavier addictions.
      However, at the end of the day, semantics doesn't help us much, if at all. People around us are struggling with problems caused and maintained by habits, vices, over-indulgences - which ultimately turn into addictions; so, let's just shorten the track, and call it by the more frightening name of 'addiction'.

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  21. This post is very interesting to me. I am not religious but I follow many of the old religious customs in spite of that.

    btw I used to watch Marina Vlady films as a teenager. I suppose she was more known in Europe than in the UK or USA. I had forgotten all about her until I saw your picture of her.

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    1. Thank you for finding my post interesting.
      I'm a fan of Marina Vlady and the beauty she represents. That's why I put her photo on the sidebar.

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  22. This is an interesting post for many reasons. My mother is a devout Catholic and when we were growing up she would give up smoking cigarettes for the 40 days of Lent. She did a wonderful job of it but on Easter Sunday morning, she would pick up that horrible habit again and she would take us to church dressed in our gorgeous Easter dresses that she had handmade and we were clothed in the stench of cigarettes. Granted it was a more tolerant time and they didn't know then how dangerous smoking and second hand smoke was.

    I would ask her why she could give up smoking for God, but not for her family, she never really gave me a good answer to that.

    She continued that habit of giving up cigarettes up until 10 years ago when she just quit smoking forever.

    I've always felt that during Lent, if we are going to give up something it should be something that we have in our life that consumes us and is bad for us and that we should use that time to strengthen our resolve to never pick up that bad habit again.

    Several years ago, I was a Confirmation teacher for about eight years. Instead of telling my students to give up something such as soda or candy, I would tell them instead to do something out of love and respect for their family or their community. I would tell them to decide to help their parents more around the house. To clean or cook or just do their homework without being nagged. Maybe mow an elderly neighbors lawn, or volunteer at a homeless shelter. I was surprised that they were receptive to those ideas and they got to keep eating candy!

    Your post has stirred up a lot of memories and I always love reading everyone else's comments.

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    1. I'm glad my post stirred up your memories. It is very interesting to read about them, and learn about your point of view.
      Thank you, Alicia, for such a detailed and beautifully written comment.

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  23. I think you've already eaten your first tasty bread. Extra tasty.

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    1. The first slice of bread after holiday is over - is always super tasty.

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  24. DUTA, I thinking fasting, for people of any faith or none, can be used as a reminder of many things, including what you said, "that I'm more than just an animal looking for food." Can also make one more mindful about their eating and maybe help in making more healthful choices.

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    1. Yes, this is an important reminder - that I'm not just an animal looking for food.

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  25. Just popping in to say hello! Hugs...RO

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  26. Hello to you, too. Thanks.

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  27. As I've written often in my blog, when my late brother and I were children we attended Sunday School (the Presbyterian Church) ever Sunday without fail. I've not gone to church other than for weddings (and they are very few and very far between these days) in many, many years. I don't class myself as a religious person. However, in saying that...I have never eaten meat on Good Friday...not once....a tradition from when I was a child when we never ate meat...only fish on Good Fridays. We weren't Catholics, who never eat meat on Fridays (or used not to do so...I don't know if that has changed through the years)...but there are some traditions, whether religion-driven or not, stick with us.

    And to uphold them...doesn't hurt us. :)

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    1. I agree with you in that there are traditions we stick to them regardless of religion. And, indeed, it doesn't hurt us, on the contrary.

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