Tuesday, April 10, 2018

The Design Museum - Holon




April 2018 is the last month of the current exhibition, "Je t'aime.." at the Design Museum in the city of Holon (they usually change exhibitions every few months).
So, soon after  Passover holiday , I rushed to the museum 'to catch'  the above mentioned exhibition which had stirred up my curiosity.


exhibition Sign from the  direction of the parking lot

The exhibition is dedicated to Ronit Elkabetz, actress and filmaker in Israel and in France. She died two years ago at the age of 52 in battle with cancer. Her untimely death came as a surprise as very few knew she was ill. 

Her younger brother, Shlomi Elkabetz, is the art director of this exhibition which focuses on art and fashion connection as seen in the world of his late sister and co-worker. 


Outside the museum, several posters let people know about the exhibition and its subject.


poster regarding exhibition on the facade of the Cinematheque

 name of exhibition and face of the actress in the inner courtyard

The building of the museum (architect Ron Arad) in itself, is definitely worth a visit. It is considered as one of the most original architectonic achievements of the early 21st  century. The outer structure, the 'envelope', is just mind- blowing.

outer structure - five steel bands arranged in a wavy format


inside video with the architect's words on the process

Five bands of corten steel that surround most of the museum's facades are arranged in an undulating way, and change color (shades of red, brown, orange) .The inside is compact and modest. It comprises two main exhibition halls, one upstairs , one downstairs, a staircase linking between the two (there's a lift too), and an entrance floor with offices and two additional spaces for exhibits.
There's a sort of inner courtyard, partly covered, leading to the entrance. The museum also hosts an archive of design materials opened to the public.


color shades


to the entrance

The museum (opened in 2010) is located in a culture area, named Mediatheque, that includes a central library, a youth theater center, a cinematheque, and nearby , the design faculty of the Holon Institute of Technology. The museum is next to road, across from a shopping mall and some residential areas.


adjacent Mediateque

Mall with tower clock across the museum

On the exhibition "Je T'aime...", hopefully, in my next post.



31 comments:

  1. It looks like an amazing building and sounds like a poignant exhibit. I like the blossom tree in front ! Do you know the Guggenheim Museum in NY? I thought of it because of the spiralling shape and unique presence in the cityscape, kind of like coming across the Guggenheim on 5th ave. I look forward to seeing about the exhibit if you do a post on it!! Looks like a nice outing after the week of Passover! Hope you had a good Passover! Blessings!

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    1. Never been to New York, so no Guggenheim Museum.
      Nice outing, indeed. During the Pesach week it was entrance free, but I wouldn't have enjoyed the place with all those masses of holyday visitors.

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  2. Just 52. I remember when that was old.

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    1. Yes, tragic. She left two tiny kids who desperately needed their mother (she got married in 2010).

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  3. A very interesting building design, very retro too!
    So many people dying from cancer these days. In my country the levels of cancer deaths have gone dramatically high after USA and the West bombed us back in 1999 with uranium bombs... what you don't kill then, you kill later, I guess.

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    1. I wonder which country is that (sorry for my ignorance).

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    2. Serbia, I live in its Northern region of Vojvodina.

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  4. Olá, confesso que nuca ouvi ou li sobre Ronit Elkabetz, certamente que a exposição em sua honra é merecida.
    Continuação de feliz semana,
    AG

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    1. Ronit Elkabetz was known mainly in Israel and in France as she was fluent in both languages (hebrew and french),and that certainly was an advantage.

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  5. Oh fantastic! I can't wait to read about the exhibit, too. What a neat place full of character.

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    1. Full of character, indeed. No one can be indifferent to its shape.
      Thank you, Tanya, for stoping by.

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  6. After reading this post, Duta, I searched online for information on Ms. Elkabetz, who I did nit know about. She was indeed a beautiful and talented woman who cancer tragically took far too young. The building looks amazing and I look forward to reading about the exhibit too.

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    1. Well, she's not very known internationally except in the two countries mentioned previously: Israel and France. She had, however, attended various, prestigious international film festivals.

      Yes, "amazing" would be an appropriate descriptive term of the building.

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  7. Your posts are always very interesting, DUTA...with great photos to match...showing us readers....well, me, fanyway, places I will never physically get to see, and very rarely read about elsewhere.

    Your posts and photos extend my awareness and knowledge of what is there...so thank you. :

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    1. Thanks, Lee for your very kind words. I'm glad and flattered by the way you feel about my photos and the content of my posts.

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  8. Like that entrance with the colour shades.

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  9. The color shades of the steel ribbons are, indeed, quite an attraction.
    As for the entrance, you walk in under a semi-covered yard, where you have the option to take the regular route or the one exposed to the elements- and that's nice.

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  10. DUTA, I have been touring the past few posts on your site. It is informative and fascinating. Following.

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    1. Thank you for your kind words. "informative and fascinating" make me feel very flattered.

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  11. The building housing the Design Museum is beautiful. I used to work in a building made of Corten Steel and loved the way the steel changed colors over time. The design itself is slightly reminicient of the Guggenheim in NYC, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and one of the most interesting buildings in NYC. I do hope you will share photos from the exhibit.

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    1. Welcome!
      One of the commenters has mentioned Guggenheim, so I looked it up on the Web; yes, there's resemblance in the outer structure.
      In both cases, the 'envelope' is beautiful.

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  12. The museum is exquisite and you told of the culture center very well. What a fascinating tour at just the right time. I've been to Israel during Pesach but I enjoyed the feel of the crowds and the celebration. So many people and not enough rental cars! Ha. Your posts always are fun to read, Duta.

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    1. I too can enjoy the crowds in Nature, on the street, but not in a confined place like a museum. This is a lovely museum but quite small.
      The last sentence of your comment makes me glad. Thanks.

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  13. Replies
    1. Part two, the exhibition Je t'aime.., is something different, just as the outer structure of the museum is something different - not usual, certainly not standard.

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  14. What a magnificent museum! I find the architecture so interesting.

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    1. No doubt, all the high superlatives in the list would fit this building: magnificient, interesting, amazing, spectacular, etc..

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  15. I sure wish I liked to travel. This looks like a beautiful building!

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    1. I would say 'beautiful'is an understatement. It is kind of unique, though there's some resEmblance with Guggenheim museum in N.C

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