Saturday, May 14, 2011

''The Rimon Experience"



There's a lovely five-letter hebrew word רימון Rimon which means both pomegranate and grenade. Good music is juicy like the fruit (pomegranate) and explosive like the weapon (grenade); thus 'Rimon' seems an appropriate name for the independent, professional school of modern music in Israel.




Here it is (the school), behind the fence



The Rimon school of music (which has an exchange agreement with Berklee college of music in Boston, USA) offers studies in a variety of musical fields : composition, songwriting, performance (general and jazz, vocal and instrumental), film scoring, music teaching .


The students at this school (some 500) come from various countries ; the diversity of their cultural backgrounds helps create a richly flavored music and original interpretations. ''Rimon'' graduates are very appreciated professionally both in Israel and abroad.

The modest campus is located in a green, quiet residential neighborhood and it consists of several one-storey buildings with classrooms, recording studios, a library, performance spaces , and the outer recreation space.
The flat buildings could well do with some remodelling and fresh paint, but I am told that an entirely new complex is about to be constructed near by, so that would explain the present state of the existing structures.



needs some fresh paint


entrance to one of the buildings (see painted exterior)




recreation space



Rimon school is not far from my home, and yet I don't often come near the place. I think it's something psychological , and it has nothing to do with music but rather with my feelings of reluctance regarding general and local political elections. The polling station where I 'm supposed to place my vote on Elections Day is located ...on the same street with the Rimon school of music.

35 comments:

Angelina said...

I love how the two words blend together to make Rimon... "Good music is juicy like the fruit (pomegranate) and explosive like the weapon (grenade); thus 'Rimon' seems an appropriate name for the independent, professional school of modern music in Israel."

Looks like a school which could create beautiful music within its' walls to the delight of its students. Nice.

Trevor Woodford said...

Schools are such special places and this looks like a very special school. A very interesting post....Well done.

-Trevor

TallTchr said...

The old G.I. slang for grenades was pineapples but they look different now.

Dimple said...

A beautiful exterior is not so necessary, if what comes from within is worthy.

I am no botanist, but I was told that the pomegranate, when ripe, also explodes.

I like the parable here.

Janie B said...

This looks like a great school of just the right size. I never knew pomegranates exploded.

matron said...

I always enjoy the the information you give in your posts,I never tire of it as I learn something interesting from each one.
This school of music is such an asset,long may it continue.

DUTA said...

Angelina,

I'm not sure the neighbours are as delighted with the music as the students are, but I believe they're proud of having a famous institution such as Rimon in their vicinity.

Trevor Woodford,

A school of the arts (music, dance, picture, sculpture) is always a special place.

Talltchr,

Thanks for the information. May God protect us from grenades whatever their shape .

Dimple,

Right - it's the 'within' that matters. You always contribute such wise remarks, Dimple!

Janie B,

I didn't know it either, until I read it in Dimple's comment. That's an interesting piece of information.

matron,

"Rimon" school is indeed an asset.
Thank you for your warm words; I feel flattered.

Susan Deborah said...

The word sounds lovely and strangely the granate of pomegranate and grenade sound similar. I wonder how both the words are the same. How about the root word, DUTA? The origin should have some history.

Dimple's connection seems plausible.

Joy always,
Susan

DUTA said...

In French the word is pomme-grenade, but 'grenade' here is said to be related to the name of the spanish city of Granada, not to an explosive device.

The 'granate' in pommegranate comes from Latin (granatus,granum) meaning seed, grain. Indeed the fruit is full of juicy red seeds.

I too think that the information given by Dimple as to the exploding ripe fruit is plausible.

Lady Di Tn said...

Another informative post. Thank you. It is funny that something etc can make a place take on a different feeling for us. Peace

Kim @ Stuff could... said...

This sounds like a neat school. Thank you for introducing me to it!

Alicia said...

In spanish the word for Pomegranate is "granada" which is like grenade. I love the word Rimon though. It will be interesting to see what the new school looks like. Keep us up to date DUTA!

DUTA said...

Lady Di Tn,

A place could arouse different feelings in different people due to something specific. In this case the name Rimon and the music.

Kim & stuff...,

Yes, it does look and sound like a neat school. Its graduates and their art as said in the post, are quite appreciated all over the world.

Alicia,

Thanks for the info on the spanish version of pomegranate.
I do hope to write about the new building, but I'm afraid it will take some time until it will be erected.

Bica said...

I would love to live near a music school. How could you not love that? I'm looking forward to seeing pictures of the new building, but love the look of the old. Thanks for taking us to this wonderful place, DUTA.

Lisa Petrarca said...

How very interesting-I love it...Rimon! Now if you can just tell me exactly how to pronounce it Duta. I would like to show off to my hubby, that I know a Hebrew word!LOL Another wonderful & interesting post (I always learn something from you!)

I hope your shoulder is feeling better, my hip is! I didn't allow them to use steroids on me either. I'm kind of crazy about ONLY NATURAL things (vitamins, Omega-3, Acaii etc.) Anyways, just happy to be walking around again. Thank you for your kind words!

GET WELL SOON FRIEND!

magda said...

Haha, you're right, you have to pamper and from outside, since it is so appreciates school!
Thank you for the interesting TOUR!!
Many greetings

Trudy Callan said...

What a treasure inside of that little building. And love the quote comparing music to juicy fruit. So true.

DUTA said...

Bica,

I would love that too. It's an opportunity to get 'free concerts' and meet young gifted people. The school brings honour and pride to its neighbours.

Lisa Petrarca,

The 'i' in Rimon is pronounced like the 'e' in Reform.
My shoulder is better,thank you, but I still have some difficulty when raising the arm. Thanks for for wishing me well.

Magda,

Yes, it's worth pampering. It deserves a better building and facilities as it contributes a lot to music and to the country's musical reputation.

Trudy Callan,

You've summed it up perfectly: A great treasure generating juicy miusic. Thank you.

Phivos Nicolaides said...

A school is a temple for me...

Cindy Lew's Studio said...

Duta, as always, thanks for the great information. That is why I love coming to your blog. Thanks for stopping by and yes I will enjoy my summer. I always think each year that I will never have another set of students that I enjoy so much and then I get the next group in and we have fun and they learn and for the most part we enjoy the year. I think I always get a couple of students I could do without, but that is normal in life, so I take it for what it is and remember that I am the adult in the matter and move on. It is truly a blessing to me to have students that like to come to class.

Warm Wishes, CindyLew

Lynda Lehmann said...

What an interesting name!

You might be able to sit outdoors in the recreation area and hear some beautiful strains, if you were so inclined.

But I, like you, would probably not want to find solace near our local polling place!

DUTA said...

Phivos Nicolaides,

What a lovely, clever saying that is! A temple, indeed.

Cyndy Lew's Studio,

I'm sure you're a wonderful teacher, totally dedicated to your students. Lucky them! Keep enjoying both teaching and vacations!
Lynda Lehman,

One could hear wonderful sounds coming out of classrooms , but to get there I have to pass by the polling station which reminds me of politics and corruption, so, there goes my pleasure.

Margie said...

My husband and I have been talking about taking a trip to Israel and I so appreciate your sharing about Israel on your blog!
Really enjoyed this post!

C Hummel Kornell a/k/a C Hummel Wilson said...

Another wonderful lesson from you! I love that music and the sharing of music is alive and well in our world. I believe all artistic endeavors resonate in the souls of mankind everywhere...without the arts, the world could not exist.

Thanks for sharing, Duta.

Susan said...

Interesting how news of the world shapes our views, adn I can honestly say, sadly, that I have never given a thought to the nurturing of cultural arts in Israel. As "they say" in journalism, "if it bleeds, it leads", so seldom, if ever, do reporters do features on the positive (and essential) elements of society. so thank you, Duta, for opening my eyes - again!

Nezzy said...

School of Music...now that's my kinda school. (Says the gal with a song on her lips 24/7) I cannot imagine a world without music. What a wonderful place you've taken us to. I love the name too!

Enjoy this blessed day sweet friend! :o)

Susannah said...

Wonderful to learn about the 'nooks & crannies' of the Israeli culture. Thank you SO much for sharing!

(p.s. I also came by to offer a humble, deeply felt apology for the behavior of the man who is supposed to be the president of my country - for what he said about Israel today. I honestly don't know who he thinks he is, & he does NOT speak for my America.)

Sorry to bring politics here - again. You are my only friend in Israel, & I feel a deep need to apologize. Please, dear Duta, delete this comment if you need to...

robert said...

Have you ever wonder why human invented music? I think because of our souls. Because music ennobles our souls.
Music is always welcome!

DUTA said...

Margie,

Israel is a great touristic destination despite its small size and hostile neighbours.
Glad you've enjoyed this post

C Hummel Kornel a/k/a C Hummel Wilson,

I totally agree with your belief "...without the arts the world could not exist". Coming from you, a painter and writer, this sentence has great resonance.

Susan,

Unfortunately, Israel is on the Media mainly in negative context (wars, terrorism)and that's very sad. There's a rich cultural life going on within its borders, but that doesn't sell news.

Nezzy,

Of course, You're the ''kinda gal who likes that ''kinda school'. I wouldn't believe it any other way. I'm glad you like the place (the Rimon school of music )and its name. Blessings to you!

'Susannah,

No need for you to apologize. I think the american people want their president to give priority to their country's problems (debt, deficit, wars) instead of meddling into other countries' affairs first. Thanks anyway for your kind words.

robert,

Indeed, music and soul go well together. I certainly agree with your idea of music ennobeling and refining our soul.

J_on_tour@jayzspaze said...

I like the fusion between explosive and juicy. It has to grab our attention and inspire us as well as just being nice. Politics must be a more difficult problem in your country than most others.

DUTA said...

J on tour@jayspaze,

The word 'fúsion'' is very appropriate here.

Politics in our country is a rather depressing affair. There are some ten-twelve political parties, and none of them has as main goal the good of the country.

PinkPanthress said...

I like the exterior of theose buildings, the time-worn look somehow suits them.
Also, I love that Bach is present on the Mural.

DUTA said...

I'm glad you like the exterior and the mural. Come to think of it, you're right about the suitable "time-worn look".

Dimple said...

Hi Duta,
I am sorry you had trouble commenting on my blog; blogger seems to be experiencing a spate of difficulties lately. I already have my comments set at the least restrictive level without allowing anonymous commenters, and I am shy about doing that, as I don't want to deal with spam. I will think about experimenting with it, however.

I did receive both your comments, though, and I appreciate you letting me know there was a problem.

Blessings!

DUTA said...

Dimple,

I'm glad you receved my comments; "all's well that ends well" as they say.

There's always some sort of trouble either with Blogger or with the computer in general, and this sure gets on our nerves(sigh).