Saturday, November 7, 2009

Turkish "Delight"


potatoes on the israeli market.

still in use in some turkish markets

Turkey , as far as I know, is the largest producer of potatoes in the Middle East. I like the texture of those smooth reddish potatoes imported from Turkey.
I eat them mainly as mashed potatoes accompanied by cheese ,meat, or fish.

Lately, the relationship between Turkey and Israel has developed into something ugly ; israelis have reported meeting with great hostility in many parts of Turkey. One of the Turks' favorite "greetings" is to spit on the israeli tourist. As a result of this atmosphere, and of some political issues between the two countries, there are voices calling for a boycott on turkish products. A neighbour of mine is rather 'active' in this initiative.

Last month, she "caught" me at the supermarket with turkish potatoes in my basket and criticized me for that. I said : " Look, I don't drink turkish coffee, I don't buy turkish lokum (also known as turkish delight), I don't eat turkish kebab or lachmajun, I don't even intend to visit Turkey ,although I could if I wish , go as a non israeli (I own also a romanian passport); Isn't that good enough for you? I won't give up the potatoes. Period".

I'm not much in favor of boycotts, but those here who want an efficient boycott, should , I think, concentrate on the touristic issue. All year long, israelis 'invade' Turkey, and so, nicely contribute to its economy. One of the most popular regions favored by the israelis is Antalya , known as the 'Turkish Riviera"; this resort offers lots of attractions at very reasonable prices.


Soon after the incident at the supermarket, I met my neighbor's son, a fresh computer science graduate, and asked for his expert advice on buying a new computer. "Can it wait a week" he asked me "I'll be back by then from Antalya and we shall discuss this matter at length" "Antalya?! Does your mother know where you're flying to ?" " She bought me the tickets as a graduation present" was his reply.

How about that?!!



Antalya - beach

on the way - in Antalya

51 comments:

  1. I might have to question her on that one! I love to read what you write. It opens windows to a world I know nothing about. Thank you for that.

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  2. Something like pot calling the kettle black springs to mind here. I'm with you mashed potatoes are a weakness of mine.

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  3. Wow... that is nerve I would think. I am with Sue, I might have to question her on that also. And I do enjoy your posts, so much. We as Americans, take so much for granted. Thank you for sharing!

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  4. WoW, something I didn't know about Turkey or potatoes. Just goes to show ya'll, be very careful what you say 'cause before ya know you may be buying your son a ticket to Turkey!

    Thanks for sharing your world with us. Have a wonderfully blessed weekend void of spit!!!

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  5. very interesting post, thank you

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  6. Sounds like mom talks out of both sides of her mouth. I don't care to be lectured to and don't like people who lecture other adults.

    I respect other people's ideas and expect the same.

    Interesting post and life you lead.

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  7. Sue (Someone's Mom),

    I'm glad you think my post "opens windows" to some unknown world. New worlds always seem interesting and arousing curiosity.

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  8. St. Jude,

    You've got good taste in food; mash potatoes is delicious and goes well with everything.

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  9. Nel,

    Indeed, that is nerve. When I faced her with the info got from her son, she blamed him for insisting on going to Antalya, and said something like ..."you know children these days.."

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  10. Nezzy,

    It's always good and even useful to learn something new.
    "void of spit" - I like your kind of humor.
    Have a wonderful weekend too!

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  11. Elise,

    Thanks for stopping by. I'm glad and proud that you find my post interesting.

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  12. Sandy,

    I'm of the same opinion as you. Live and let live. I don't like to be lectured and won't lecture to others, especially if you can't educate your own flesh and blood as in the case of this neighbour and her son.
    Thanks for visiting and for your nice comment.

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  13. I too enjoy reading your blog and have learned about many new things already. It does open my eyes to other places and I thoroughly enjoy it. P.S. I love mashed potatoes too!

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  14. It's always interesting to read about politics and current affairs that go on in other parts of the world. Your post bring it home. Imagine people wanting to boycott potatoes!

    You will have to tell your neighbor she is "busted"! :-)

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  15. Thanks. I always learn from your posts since I am from a different part of the world. Love those red potatoes myself. I guess we've all had those times of standing strong for something, until it no longer serves us....like a nice vacation at reasonable price! Take care. I'm sorry they don't treat you well in Turkey. That is not right.

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  16. Your post reminds me a bit of what happened with some people here in regards to the U.S.'s relations with France....people were calling for a boycott on anything French and even going so far as to rename french fries. I guess as far as your neighbor goes it is one of those cases of do as I say, not as I do?!

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  17. That's really funny - but sad that she didn't seem to get the irony when you mentioned it to her.

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  18. Cheryl,

    Thank you for your kind words. I'm really glad you enjoy reading my blog.

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  19. Jo,

    Interesting indeed. Yet there are , unfortunately, may sad aspects accompanying these affairs in the Middle East.

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  20. Just Playin'

    Potatoes is not luxury, it's basic food , so naturally we want it to be of good quality, so that we enjoy the eating.
    You're right about people's "standing strong for something until it no longer serves us".

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  21. Anita,

    Exactly. It's "do as I say, not as I do". You couldn't have phrased this better.

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  22. The Bug,

    When I confronted her, I told her that if she can't influence her own son, she shouldn't try to influence other people into following her line.

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  23. Duta
    Glad you called her bluff. The nerve of some folks never cesses to amaze me. How do you fix your red mashed potatoes? Everyone has a little different trick. When I mash potatoes, I use sour cream instead of milk and butter and salt to taste. What is your secret?
    Thanks for sharing as I continue to learn when I make my visit.
    Peace

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  24. boycots never work (almost never); keep buying the potatos, I'm sure the farmer will appreciate it. . .

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  25. I would keep on buying those potatoes, too. They sound scrumptious.

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  26. Seems a "Do as I say, not as I do" matter. Enjoy your potatoes Duta!

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  27. Lady Di Tn,

    The secret lies in the texture of these potatoes. I personally add nothing because of dietetic reasons , but any of the following ingredients you've mentioned: butter, sour cream, milk - does the work perfectly.

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  28. Coralee,

    I believe so too. It's the farmer, the little man that looses when a boycott takes place.

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  29. Kys,

    Well I'm buying them all the time. especially now that the weather gets colder and hot potatoes warm us up.

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  30. I'm not much into boycotts, but one year my husband boycotted French Wine and when I asked him, why? His reply, I don't remember.

    As always, love your blog and the pictures are priceless.

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  31. Alicia,

    Yes, indeed. A lady blogger before you, Anita, has also used this phrase , which is, of course, true.
    Thank you, I'll sure enjoy these potatoes.

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  32. Angelina,

    That's a good one, with your husband.
    Thank you for loving the blog and the pictures.

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  33. HI Duta,
    I am honoured that you have chosen to follow my blog, and having just gone through a portion of yours, I will happily return the compliment!
    My potatoes from Prince Edward Island are cheerfully boiling away as I type, to go with a roast of beef.
    As for your neighbour...sad really. I'd be tempted to make her potato leek soup with delightful Turkish potatos of course!

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  34. Susan,

    Welcome! I'm glad and honored to follow your blog and at the same time have you as a follower.
    Enjoy your meal with potatoes and roast beef!

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  35. Duta,

    The potatoes have it...however, I get mine from Idaho. Love them mashed with garlic, butter and cream. Talk about comfort food. Wouldn't it be wonderful if we all could relate to one another on the basis of food and friendship? The people who insist on wars, boycotts and other political attitudes simply should set down together to share a good, basic home cooked meal (from each of their homes). Share the wonder that is food and it's basic sustenance. Potatoes would be a good start since they seem to have an international following. Something most everyone could agree on. As always, love your post. Agree with your actions. Never let small-minded people get the better of you.

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  36. C Hummel Kornell a/k/a C Hummel Wilson,

    What a beautiful comment! Agree with you on the wonders of basic home cooked food and on never letting "small-minded" people interfere.
    Your mashed potatoees sound delicious!

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  37. Ooooo, so many comments, Duta :)
    Lovely post and I love the pictures.
    I agree with you that the best way to boycott is not to go to Turkey!
    I love the red potatoes too. I roast them with rosemary and garlic...yummmm!
    I love it that you are such a strong person. You have your convictions and you stick to them...always in a very practical and intelligent manner. If only more of us used our brains instead of our emotions in situations like this the world would be a better place!
    Great post as always!
    Have a Wonderful Day, Duta :)
    I need to get over here more quickly!! I have been a bad blogger lately.
    Love to You!
    Kelly

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  38. TheChicGeek,

    Kelly, you're such a warm person, and your words are accordingly to your nature.
    I'm not sure I am a strong person , but I do have principles and try to stick to them.
    I agree with you as to the benefits of using brain over emotions.
    Have a wonderful Day, too!

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  39. Well I say ha, ha, ha on HER and her potatos.

    What's that saying...something kinda famous? Get the beam out of your own eye before you try and get the speck out of your bother's?

    As far as potatos, mmmmmm! I have to fit in a tiny black dress on Sat. night; man would I love a bunch of those red turkish potatos, with real butter, sour cream and chives.

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  40. Entrepeneur Chick,

    Well said: "Get the beam....before you try and get the speck....".

    I've got the same problem - eating potatoes and getting into a tiny black dress...

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  41. Hi Duta,
    I find this ironic, and quite human. It is so easy to see what others do that we don't like, but difficult to see that we do the same things!

    Thanks for stopping by!

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  42. Dimple,

    Yes, it is so, both ironic and human. That's human nature. Thanks for the comment.

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  43. Live your life, not on others life. Each must decide for himself not to others. This women interferd in the lives of others without any rights.

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  44. Bianca Popa,

    I'm glad you see it this way; the woman had no right to criticize me, especially that she behaved contrary to what she demanded of me.

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  45. Shalom! What a fascinating blog. Lets keep in touch. Kind regards from Cyprus. Philip

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  46. Phivos Nicolaides,

    Hello Cyprus! Thanks for visiting and for the compliment.

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  47. Love your blog Duta!
    So glad to be here!

    Margie:)

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  48. Margie,
    Thanks a lot. I love your blog too.

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  49. That is pretty funny! Have you eaten Turkish Delight? Do you like it? I have never even seen it but I like trying new things :) It is always amazing when i see your name on my posts. I love that you visit & think it is so special to have a friend on the other side of the world! I learn so much from your blog! I am not much of a traveler besides to the coasts here in the US. So I travel with you! So, did you get a good computer?

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  50. You know what, this Neighbour of yours is being very rude. Your Potatoes don't serve Turkey as much as her Son's Holidays there!!! DX

    On another note, I think that this whole dispute between both of these Countries is stupid! They had such good Relations before, I think it's ridiculous...

    You know, I'm only half German, my mom is Turkish, but I have a few Israili friends on the Net & a few jewish friends in my home City & the Town I live in now!

    I don't care what Religion you have or what your Politicians do, you are a very nice person & that's what counts to me! :)

    Also the whole spitting stuff is very un-turkish, and I'm personally very ashamed of it if they do that to Israili Tourists...

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  51. :) :) Loved the way you express some serious issues with a touch of wit and fun.
    I wonder how you might be when you were actually a kid. Naughty or the calm studious type :P
    Your posts are making me addicted to your writing style!!!

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